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Adamantane-like molecules, Neurotoxins

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Amidines (4)
Analgesics (4)
Antiarrhythmic agents (4)
Bases (chemistry) (4)
Drugs acting on the cardiovascular system (4)
Drugs acting on the nervous system (4)
Guanidines (4)
Sodium channel blockers (4)
Voltage-gated sodium channel blockers (4)
Convulsants (1)

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TETRODOTOXIN (4368-28-9)  
Tarichatoxin  ·  Tetradotoxin  ·  Fugu Toxin
Tarichatoxin (4368-28-9)  
Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin. Its name derives from Tetraodontiformes, an order that includes pufferfish, porcupinefish, ocean sunfish, and triggerfish; several of these species carry the toxin. Although tetrodotoxin was discovered in these fish and found in several other aquatic animals (e.g., in blue-ringed octopuses, rough-skinned newts, and moon snails), it is actually produced by certain infecting or symbiotic bacteria like Pseudoalteromonas, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio as well as other species found in the animals.
Tetramine (80-12-6)  
Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is an organic compound that is used as a rodenticide (rat poison). It is an odorless, tasteless white powder that is slightly soluble in water, DMSO and acetone, and insoluble in methanol and ethanol. TETS is a sulfamide derivative, it can be synthesized by reacting sulfamide with formaldehyde under acidic condition.

Related Results:
T2 Toxin (21259-20-1)  
Fusaritoxin  ·  Fusariotoxin  ·  T 2 Toxin
T-2 Mycotoxin (pronounced as 'Tee-Two') is a trichothecene mycotoxin. It is a naturally occurring mold byproduct of Fusarium spp. fungus which is toxic to humans and animals.
ZEARALENONE (17924-92-4, 36455-70-6)  
F2 Toxin  ·  F-2 Toxin  ·  F 2 Toxin
Zearalenone (ZEN), also known as RAL and F-2 mycotoxin, is a potent estrogenic metabolite produced by some Fusarium and Gibberella species. Particularly, is produced by Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium cerealis, Fusarium equiseti, Fusarium verticillioides, and Fusarium incarnatum. Several Fusarium species produce toxic substances of considerable concern to livestock and poultry producers, namely deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin, HT-2 toxin, diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS) and zearalenone.
TETRODOTOXIN (4368-28-9)  
Tarichatoxin  ·  Tetradotoxin  ·  Fugu Toxin
Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin. Its name derives from Tetraodontiformes, an order that includes pufferfish, porcupinefish, ocean sunfish, and triggerfish; several of these species carry the toxin. Although tetrodotoxin was discovered in these fish and found in several other aquatic animals (e.g., in blue-ringed octopuses, rough-skinned newts, and moon snails), it is actually produced by certain infecting or symbiotic bacteria like Pseudoalteromonas, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio as well as other species found in the animals.
SAXITOXIN (73603-72-2, 35523-89-8)  
Saxitoxin (STX) is a potent neurotoxin and the best-known paralytic shellfish toxin (PST). Ingestion of saxitoxin, usually by consumption of shellfish contaminated by toxic algal blooms, is responsible for the human illness known as paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). The term saxitoxin originates from the genus name of the butter clam (Saxidomus) from which it was first isolated.
Melitten (37231-28-0)  
Melittin  ·  Mellitin
Tarichatoxin (4368-28-9)  
Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a potent neurotoxin. Its name derives from Tetraodontiformes, an order that includes pufferfish, porcupinefish, ocean sunfish, and triggerfish; several of these species carry the toxin. Although tetrodotoxin was discovered in these fish and found in several other aquatic animals (e.g., in blue-ringed octopuses, rough-skinned newts, and moon snails), it is actually produced by certain infecting or symbiotic bacteria like Pseudoalteromonas, Pseudomonas, and Vibrio as well as other species found in the animals.
1,2-Dibromotetrafluorobenzene (827-08-7)  
diphtheria toxin fragment B  ·  DTFB  ·  fragment B diphtheria toxin
DSP 4 (62078-98-2)  
DSP4  ·  az-DSP 4  ·  DSP-4
For the Super NES enhancement chip see List of Super NES enhancement chips DSP-4, or N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine, is a neurotoxin selective for noradrenergic neurons, capable of crossing the blood–brain barrier. It exerts transient effects in peripheral sympathetic neurons, but more permanent changes within neurons of the central nervous system. It can induce long-term depletion in cortical and spinal levels of noradrenaline.
TASOSARTAN (145733-36-4)  
Tasosartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist. It was withdrawn from FDA review by the manufacturer after phase III clinical trials showed elevated transaminases (a sign of possible liver toxicity) in a significant number of participants given the drug.
DIQUAT (85-00-7, 2764-72-9, 231-36-7)  
Diquat Dibromide
Diquat is a contact herbicide that produces desiccation and defoliation most often available as the dibromide, diquat dibromide. Brand names for this formulation include Aquacide, Dextrone, Preeglone, Deiquat, Spectracide, Detrone, Reglone, Reglon, Reglox, Tribune, Ortho-Diquat, Weedtrine-D, Weedol 2 and, in combination with glyphosate, Resolva. Diquat is a non-selective herbicide that acts quickly to damage only those parts of the plant to which it is applied.
Acetylcholine perchlorate (927-86-6)  
Acetylcholine  ·  Acetylcholine Chloride  ·  Miochol
2-Phenylpropylamine (582-22-9)  
beta-methylphenethylamine  ·  beta-methylphenylethylamine  ·  BMPEA compound
β-Methylphenethylamine (β-Me-PEA, BMPEA), or 1-amino-2-phenylpropane, is an organic compound of the phenethylamine class, and a positional isomer of the drug amphetamine, with which it shares some properties. In particular, both amphetamine and β-methylphenethylamine are human TAAR1 agonists. In appearance, it is a colorless or yellowish liquid.
acetylcholine (51-84-3)  
Acetylcholine Chloride  ·  Miochol  ·  Acetylcholine Bromide
Acetylcholine (ACh) is an organic chemical that functions in the brain and body of many types of animals, including humans, as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by nerve cells to send signals to other cells. Its name is derived from its chemical structure: it is an ester of acetic acid and choline. Parts in the body that use or are affected by acetylcholine are referred to as cholinergic.
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Adamantane-like molecules
Neurotoxins
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