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Related to BUTACHLOR, Antiandrogens, Convulsants

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Antineoplastic and immunomodulating drugs (1)
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Aromatase inhibitors (1)
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endosulfan (959-98-8, 33213-65-9, 115-29-7)  
Thiodan  ·  beta-Endosulfan  ·  Thiodon
Endosulfan is an off-patent organochlorine insecticide and acaricide that is being phased out globally. The two isomers, endo and exo, are known popularly as I and II. Endosulfan sulfate is a product of oxidation containing one extra O atom attached to the S atom.

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GANAXOLONE (38398-32-2)  
Ganaxolone is an experimental CNS-selective GABAA modulator that is under development by Marinus Pharmaceuticals as an anxiolytic and anticonvulsant agent. Ganaxolone has been shown to protect against seizures in animal models, and to act a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor. Ganaxolone is being investigated for potential medical use in the treatment of epilepsy.
Tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (567-03-3, 567-02-2)  
THDOC  ·  5alpha-pregnan-3alpha,21-diol-20-one  ·  tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, (3alpha,5alpha)-isomer
Tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (abbreviated as THDOC; 3α,21-dihydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one), also referred to as allotetrahydrocorticosterone, is an endogenous neurosteroid. It is synthesized from the adrenal hormone deoxycorticosterone by the action of two enzymes, 5α-reductase type I and 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. THDOC is a potent positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor, and has sedative, anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects.
picrotoxinin (17617-45-7)  
picrotoxinine
Allopregnanolone (128-20-1, 516-55-2)  
Pregnanolone  ·  3 alpha, 5 beta-Tetrahydroprogesterone  ·  Pregnanolone, (3beta, 5beta)-isomer
Pregnanolone (128-20-1)  
Pregnanolone, also known as eltanolone (INN), as well as 3α,5β-tetrahydroprogesterone (3α,5β-THP) or 3α-hydroxy-5β-pregnan-20-one, is an endogenous neurosteroid that is biosynthesized from progesterone. It is a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA receptor, as well as a negative allosteric modulator of the glycine receptor, and is known to have sedative, anxiolytic, anesthetic, and anticonvulsant effects. It was investigated for clinical use as a general anesthetic, but produced unwanted side effects such as convulsions on occasion, and for this reason was never marketed.
Gyki-52466 (102771-26-6)  
GYKI 52466  ·  1-(p-aminophenyl)-4-methyl-7,8-methylenedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine hydrochloride
GYKI-52466 is a 2,3-benzodiazepine that acts as an ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, which is a non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist (IC50 values are 10-20, ~ 450 and >> 50 μM for AMPA- , kainate- and NMDA-induced responses respectively), orally-active anticonvulsant, and skeletal muscle relaxant. Unlike conventional 1,4-benzodiazepines, GYKI-52466 and related 2,3-benzodiazepines do not act on GABAA receptors. Like other AMPA receptor antagonists, GYKI-52466 has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties.
formestane (566-48-3)  
Formestane, sold under the brand name Lentaron among others, is a steroidal, selective aromatase inhibitor which is used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The drug is not active orally, and is instead available only as an intramuscular depot injection. Because of this, it is no longer popular as many orally active aromatase inhibitors have been identified and introduced.
diethylstilbestrol (6898-97-1, 56-53-1, 22610-99-7, 64-67-5)  
Stilbestrol  ·  Distilbène  ·  Stilbene Estrogen
Cocculin (124-87-8)  
Picrotoxin
Picrotoxin, also known as cocculin, is a poisonous crystalline plant compound. It was first isolated by the French pharmacist and chemist Pierre François Guillaume Boullay (1777–1869) in 1812. The name "picrotoxin" is a combination of the Greek words "picros" (bitter) and "toxicon" (poison).
flutamide (13311-84-7)  
Eulexin  ·  Euflex  ·  SCH 13521
Flutamide, sold under the brand name Eulexin among others, is a nonsteroidal antiandrogen (NSAA) which is used primarily to treat prostate cancer. It is also used in the treatment of androgen-dependent conditions like acne, excessive hair growth, and high androgen levels in women. It is taken by mouth, usually three times per day.
Pentylenetetrazol (54-95-5)  
Metrazol  ·  Cardiazol  ·  Pentylenetetrazole
Pentylenetetrazol, also known as pentylenetetrazole, metrazol, pentetrazol (INN), pentamethylenetetrazol, Corazol, Cardiazol or PTZ, is a drug formerly used as a circulatory and respiratory stimulant. High doses cause convulsions, as discovered by the Hungarian-American neurologist and psychiatrist Ladislas J. Meduna in 1934.
Tamoxifen citrate (54965-24-1)  
Tamoxifen  ·  Nolvadex  ·  ICI 46,474
Tamoxifen (TMX), sold under the brand name Nolvadex among others, is a medication that is used to prevent breast cancer in women and treat breast cancer in women and men. It is also being studied for other types of cancer. It has been used for Albright syndrome.
tamoxifen (13002-65-8, 10540-29-1)  
Nolvadex  ·  Tamoxifen Citrate  ·  ICI 46,474
Genostrychnine (23257-79-6, 7248-28-4)  
Movellan  ·  strychnine N-oxide  ·  strychnine N-oxide hydrochloride
raloxifene (84449-90-1)  
Raloxifene, sold under the brand name Evista among others, is a medication which is used in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and to reduce the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or at high risk for breast cancer. It is taken by mouth. Side effects of raloxifene include hot flashes, leg cramps, and an increased risk of blood clots and other cardiovascular events such as stroke.
Picrotoxinum (124-87-8)  
Picrotoxin
Picrotoxin, also known as cocculin, is a poisonous crystalline plant compound. It was first isolated by the French pharmacist and chemist Pierre François Guillaume Boullay (1777–1869) in 1812. The name "picrotoxin" is a combination of the Greek words "picros" (bitter) and "toxicon" (poison).
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Antiandrogens
Convulsants
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