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Kappa agonists, Opioid receptor ligands, Drugs acting on the nervous system, Alcohols

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Analgesics (8)
Opioids (8)
Psychoactive drugs (8)
Ethers (5)
Pharmaceuticals (5)
Semisynthetic opioids (5)
Euphoriants (4)
Mu-opioid agonists (4)
Delta-opioid agonists (3)
Nociceptin receptor agonists (3)
Synthetic opioids (3)
Analgesic (2)
Cyclic compounds (2)
Opioid antagonists (2)
Alkenes (1)
Cycloalkanes (1)
Cycloalkenes (1)
Cyclobutanes (1)
Dissociative drugs (1)
Four-membered rings (1)
Nervous system drug (1)

Etorphine (14521-96-1)  
M99  ·  Ethorphine
butorphanol (42408-82-2, 58786-99-5)  
Stadol  ·  Butorphanol Tartrate  ·  Stadol NS
Butorphanol (BC 2627) is a morphinan-type synthetic agonist–antagonist opioid analgesic developed by Bristol-Myers. Brand name Stadol was recently discontinued by the manufacturer. It is now only available in its generic formulations, manufactured by Novex, Mylan, Apotex and Ben Venue Laboratories.
levallorphan (152-02-3)  
Lorfan  ·  Naloxiphan
Levallorphan (INN, BAN) (brand names Lorfan, Naloxifan, Naloxiphan), also known as levallorphan tartrate (USAN), is an opioid modulator of the morphinan family used as an opioid analgesic and opioid antagonist/antidote. It acts as an antagonist of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) and as an agonist of the κ-opioid receptor (KOR), and as a result, blocks the effects of stronger agents with greater intrinsic activity such as morphine whilst simultaneously producing analgesia. Levallorphan was formerly widely used in general anesthesia, mainly to reverse the respiratory depression produced by opioid analgesics and barbiturates used for induction of surgical anaesthesia whilst maintaining a degree of analgesia (via KOR agonism).
Diprenorphine (14357-78-9)  
Revivon  ·  Diprenorphine Hydrochloride
Diprenorphine (brand name Revivon; former developmental code name M5050), also known as diprenorfin, is a non-selective, high-affinity, weak partial agonist of the μ- (MOR), κ- (KOR), and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) (with equal affinity) that is employed in veterinary medicine as an opioid antagonist. It is used to reverse the effects of super-potent opioid analgesics such as etorphine and carfentanil that are used for tranquilizing large animals. The drug is not approved for use in humans.
Bremazocine (83829-76-9, 75684-07-0, 79665-42-2)  
bremazocine hydrochloride, (2R)-isomer  ·  bremazocine hydrochloride, (+-)-isomer  ·  2-(1-hydroxy-cyclopropylmethyl)-5-ethyl-9,9-dimethyl-2'-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan
Bremazocine is a κ-opioid receptor agonist related to pentazocine. It has potent and long-lasting analgesic and diuretic effects. It has 200 times the activity of morphine, but appears to have no addictive properties and does not depress breathing.
CYPRENORPHINE (4406-22-8)  
Cyprenorphine (M-285) is an opioid drug. It is related to more well-known opioids such as buprenorphine, which is used as an analgesic and for the treatment of opioid addiction, and diprenorphine, which is used as an antidote to reverse the effects of other opioids. Cyprenorphine has mixed agonist–antagonist effects at opioid receptors, like those of buprenorphine.

Related Results:
15532-75-9 (15532-75-9)  
TFMPP  ·  1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine  ·  1-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperazine
3-Trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP) is a recreational drug of the piperazine chemical class. Usually in combination with its analogue benzylpiperazine (BZP), it is sold as an alternative to the illicit drug MDMA ("Ecstasy") under the name "Legal X".
TENOCYCLIDINE (21500-98-1, 1867-65-8)  
Tenocyclidine (TCP) was discovered by a team at Parke Davis in the late 1950s. It is a dissociative anesthetic drug with psychostimulant and hallucinogenic effects. It is similar in effects to phencyclidine (PCP) but is considerably more potent.
N-Methylphenethylamine (589-08-2)  
N-methylphenethylamine hydrochloride  ·  N-methylphenylethylamine  ·  N-methyl-beta-phenethylamine
N-Methylphenethylamine (NMPEA) is a naturally occurring trace amine neuromodulator in humans that is derived from the trace amine, phenethylamine (PEA). It has been detected in human urine (<1 μg over 24 hours) and is produced by phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase with phenethylamine as a substrate. PEA and NMPEA are both alkaloids that are found in a number of different plant species as well.
Nikethamide (59-26-7)  
Coramine  ·  Coramin  ·  Cordiamine
Nikethamide is a stimulant which mainly affects the respiratory cycle. Widely known by its former trade name of Coramine, it was used in the mid-twentieth century as a medical countermeasure against tranquilizer overdoses, before the advent of endotracheal intubation and positive-pressure lung expansion. It is no longer commonly considered to be of value for such purposes.
WIN VI (98034-30-1)  
Win 52035  ·  WIN 52035-2  ·  5-(5-(4-(4,5-dihydro-2-oxazolyl)phenoxy)pentyl)-3-methylisoxazole
EXIFONE (52479-85-3, 72841-23-7)  
hexahydro-2,3,4,3',4',5'-benzophenone  ·  Adlone
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Kappa agonists
Opioid receptor ligands
Drugs acting on the nervous system
Alcohols
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