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Mu-opioid agonists

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morphine (64-31-3, 57-27-2)  
Morphia  ·  Morphine Sulfate  ·  MS Contin
Morphine is a pain medication of the opiate variety which is found naturally in a number of plants and animals. It acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to decrease the feeling of pain. It can be taken for both acute pain and chronic pain.
Diacetylmorphine (561-27-3)  
Heroin  ·  Diamorphine  ·  Heroin Hydrochloride
Heroin, also known as diamorphine among other names, is an opioid most commonly used as a recreational drug for its euphoric effects. Medically it is used in several countries to relieve pain or in opioid replacement therapy. Heroin is typically injected, usually into a vein; however, it can also be smoked, snorted or inhaled.
oxycodone (76-42-6, 124-90-3)  
Oxycontin  ·  Oxycodone Hydrochloride  ·  Dihydrohydroxycodeinone
Oxycodone is a semisynthetic opioid synthesized from thebaine, an opioid alkaloid found in the Persian poppy, and one of the many alkaloids found in the opium poppy. It is a moderately potent opioid pain medication (orally roughly 1.5 times more potent than morphine), generally indicated for relief of moderate to severe pain. Oxycodone was developed in 1917 in Germany as one of several semi-synthetic opioids in an attempt to improve on the existing opioids.
methadone (76-99-3)  
Dolophine  ·  Methadone Hydrochloride  ·  Amidone
Methadone, sold under the brand name Dolophine, among others, is an opioid used to treat pain and as maintenance therapy or to help with tapering in people with opioid dependence. Detoxification using methadone can either be done relatively rapidly in less than a month or gradually over as long as six months. While a single dose has a rapid effect, maximum effect can take five days of use.
hydromorphone (466-99-9, 71-68-1)  
Dilaudid  ·  Dihydromorphinone  ·  Hydromorphone Hydrochloride
Hydromorphone, also known as dihydromorphinone, and sold under the brand name Dilaudid, among others, is a centrally acting pain medication of the opioid class. It is made from morphine. Comparatively, hydromorphone is to morphine as hydrocodone is to codeine – it is a hydrogenated ketone thereof.
Levomethorphan (510-53-2, 125-71-3, 125-70-2)  
Dextromethorphan  ·  Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide  ·  Delsym
Methorphan comes in two isomeric forms, each with differing pharmacology and effects: Dextromethorphan - An over-the-counter cough suppressant, as well as dissociative hallucinogen. Levomethorphan - A potent opioid analgesic that was never clinically developed; the codeine analogue of the powerful opioid agonist analgesic levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran). Racemethorphan refers to the racemic mixture of both of these stereoisomers.
dextromethorphan (510-53-2, 125-71-3, 125-70-2)  
Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide  ·  Delsym  ·  Levomethorphan
Methorphan comes in two isomeric forms, each with differing pharmacology and effects: Dextromethorphan - An over-the-counter cough suppressant, as well as dissociative hallucinogen. Levomethorphan - A potent opioid analgesic that was never clinically developed; the codeine analogue of the powerful opioid agonist analgesic levorphanol (Levo-Dromoran). Racemethorphan refers to the racemic mixture of both of these stereoisomers.
HYDROCODONE (125-29-1)  
Hydrocodone Bitartrate  ·  Dihydrocodeinone  ·  Hycodan
Hydrocodone, also known as dihydrocodeinone, is a semi-synthetic opioid synthesized from codeine, one of the opioid alkaloids found in the opium poppy. It is a narcotic analgesic used orally for relief of moderate to severe pain, but also commonly taken in liquid form as an antitussive/cough suppressant. Hydrocodone is prescribed predominantly within the United States, with the International Narcotics Control Board reporting that 99% of the worldwide supply in 2007 was consumed in the United States.
fentanyl (437-38-7)  
Fentanyl Citrate  ·  Sublimaze  ·  Duragesic
Fentanyl, also known as fentanil, is an opioid which is used as a pain medication and together with other medications for anesthesia. It has a rapid onset and effects generally last less than an hour or two. Fentanyl is available in a number of forms including by injection, as a skin patch, and to be absorbed through the tissues inside the mouth.
meperidine (57-42-1)  
Demerol  ·  Dolin  ·  Pethidine
Pethidine, also known as meperidine and sold under the brand name Demerol among others, is a synthetic opioid pain medication of the phenylpiperidine class. Synthesized in 1939 as a potential anticholinergic agent by the German chemist Otto Eisleb, its analgesic properties were first recognized by Otto Schaumann while working for IG Farben, Germany. Pethidine is the prototype of a large family of analgesics including the pethidine 4-phenylpiperidines (piminodine, anileridine and others), the prodines (alphaprodine, MPPP, etc.), bemidones (ketobemidone, etc.) and others more distant, including diphenoxylate and analogues.
Dextropropoxyphene (469-62-5, 2621-61-6, 2338-37-6)  
Propoxyphene  ·  Darvon  ·  Propoxyphene Hydrochloride
Dextropropoxyphene is an analgesic in the opioid category, patented in 1955 and manufactured by Eli Lilly and Company. It is an optical isomer of levopropoxyphene. It is intended to treat mild pain and also has antitussive (cough suppressant) and local anaesthetic effects.
oxymorphone (76-41-5)  
Numorphan  ·  Opana  ·  Oxymorphone Hydrochloride
Oxymorphone, sold under the brand names Numorphan among others, is a powerful semi-synthetic opioid analgesic (painkiller) developed in Germany in 1914. Pain relief after injection begins after about 5–10 minutes and 15–30 minutes after rectal administration, and lasts about 3–4 hours for immediate-release tablets and 12 hours for extended-release tablets. It is highly addictive and in June 2017 the FDA asked the manufacturer to remove its product from the US market.
levorphanol (77-07-6, 297-90-5)  
Levorphanol Tartrate  ·  Levorphan  ·  LevoDromoran
Levorphanol (INN; brand name Levo-Dromoran) is an opioid medication used to treat moderate to severe pain. It is one of four enantiomers of the compound racemorphan, and was first described in Germany in 1948 as an orally active, morphine-like analgesic. The drug has been in clinical use in the United States since 1953.
Etorphine (14521-96-1)  
M99  ·  Ethorphine
DIPHENOXYLATE (3810-80-8, 915-30-0)  
Diphenoxylate Hydrochloride  ·  Diphenoxylate Monohydrochloride
Diphenoxylate (INN, BAN) (brand name Diocalm), or diphenoxylate hydrochloride (USAN), is a centrally active opioid drug of the phenylpiperidine series that is used for the treatment of diarrhea. It acts by slowing intestinal contractions and peristalsis allowing the body to consolidate intestinal contents and prolong transit time, thus allowing the intestines to draw moisture out of them at a normal or higher rate and therefore stop the formation of loose and liquid stools. It is the main active ingredient in the anti-peristaltic medication Lomotil, which also contains atropine.
SUFENTANIL (56030-54-7)  
Sufentanil (R30730, brand name Sufenta) is a synthetic opioid analgesic drug approximately 5 to 10 times more potent than its parent drug, fentanyl, and 500 times as potent as morphine. Structurally, sufentanil differs from fentanyl through the addition of a methoxymethyl group on the piperidine ring (which is believed to reduce duration of action), and the replacement of the phenyl ring by thiophene. Sufentanil first was synthesized at Janssen Pharmaceutica in 1974.
buprenorphine (52485-79-7)  
Buprenex  ·  Buprenorphine Hydrochloride  ·  Subutex
Buprenorphine, sold under the brand name Subutex, among others, is an opioid used to treat opioid addiction, acute pain, and chronic pain. It can be used under the tongue, by injection, as a skin patch, or as an implant. When used for opioid addiction it is recommended that a health care provider observe the person while they take the medication.
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