877-202-0205     support@chemchart.com     @chemchart
        
Sign In    Register
   Reset Filters

Opioid metabolites

Categories

Analgesics (12)
Drugs acting on the nervous system (12)
Opioid receptor ligands (12)
Opioids (12)
Psychoactive drugs (12)
Euphoriants (5)
Mu-opioid agonists (5)
Analgesic (4)
Alcohols (2)
Convulsants (2)
Delta-opioid agonists (2)
Ethers (2)
Kappa agonists (2)
Neurotoxins (2)
Nociceptin receptor agonists (2)
Opiates (2)
Pharmaceuticals (2)
Semisynthetic opioids (2)
Synthetic opioids (2)
Amine oxides (1)
Amines (1)
Antiarrhythmic agents (1)
Bases (chemistry) (1)
Chalcogenides (1)
Cyclic compounds (1)
Drugs acting on the cardiovascular system (1)
Ketones (1)
Monoamine reuptake inhibitors (1)
Oxides (1)
Piperidines (1)
Potassium channel blockers (1)
Serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitors (1)
Six-membered rings (1)
Sodium channel blockers (1)

Suppliers

Sigma Aldrich (3)
Toronto Research Chemicals (1)

Dihydromorphine (1421-28-9, 509-60-4)  
Paramorfan  ·  Paramorphan
Ethyl 4-phenylpiperidine-4-carboxylate (77-17-8)  
normeperidine  ·  norpethidine  ·  normeperidine carbonate (2:1)
Pethidine, also known as meperidine and sold under the brand name Demerol among others, is a synthetic opioid pain medication of the phenylpiperidine class. Synthesized in 1939 as a potential anticholinergic agent by the German chemist Otto Eisleb, its analgesic properties were first recognized by Otto Schaumann while working for IG Farben, Germany. Pethidine is the prototype of a large family of analgesics including the pethidine 4-phenylpiperidines (piminodine, anileridine and others), the prodines (alphaprodine, MPPP, etc.), bemidones (ketobemidone, etc.) and others more distant, including diphenoxylate and analogues.
Norcodeine (467-15-2)  
N-desmethylcodeine  ·  norcodeine hydrochloride
Norpropoxyphene (3376-94-1, 66796-40-5)  
Norpropoxyphene is a major metabolite of the opioid analgesic drug dextropropoxyphene, and is responsible for many of the side effects associated with use of this drug, especially the unusual toxicity seen during dextropropoxyphene overdose. It has weaker analgesic effects than dextropropoxyphene itself, but is a relatively potent pro-convulsant and blocker of sodium and potassium channels, particularly in heart tissue, which produces prolonged intracardiac conduction time and can lead to heart failure following even relatively minor overdoses. The toxicity of this metabolite makes dextropropoxyphene up to 10 times more likely to cause death following overdose compared to other similar mild opioid analgesics, and has led to dextropropoxyphene being withdrawn from the market in some countries.
Normorphine (466-97-7)  
normorphine hydrochloride  ·  (-)-normorphine  ·  normorphine perchlorate
Normorphine is an opiate analogue, the N-demethylated derivative of morphine, that was first described in the 1950s when a large group of N-substituted morphine analogues were characterized for activity. The compound has relatively little opioid activity in its own right, but is a useful intermediate which can be used to produce both opioid antagonists such as nalorphine, and also potent opioid agonists such as N-phenethylnormorphine. It is also a major metabolite of morphine, with its formation from morphine catalyzed by the liver enzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C8.
Pseudomorphine (125-24-6)  
Pseudomorphine (also known as oxydimorphine or dehydromorphine) is an inactive, natural dimerisation product of the morphine molecule in tandem and thus a common impurity in morphine concentrations. It was first described by Pelletier in 1835. This compound may be synthesized by the oxidative coupling of morphine by potassium ferricyanide.
Noroxycodone (57664-96-7)  
Noroxycodone is the major metabolite of the opioid analgesic oxycodone. It is formed from oxycodone in the liver via N-demethylation predominantly by CYP3A4. Noroxycodone binds to and activates the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) similarly to oxycodone, although with one-third of the affinity of oxycodone and 5- to 10-fold lower activational potency.
Morphine N-oxide (639-46-3)  
Morphine-N-oxide (genomorphine) is an active opioid metabolite of morphine. Morphine itself, in trials with rats, acts 11–22 times more potent than morphine-N-oxide subcutaneously and 39–89 times more potent intraperitoneally. However, pretreatment with amiphenazole or tacrine increases the potency of morphine-N-oxide in relation to morphine (intraperitoneally more so than in subcutaneous administration).
HYDROMORPHINOL (2183-56-4)  
Hydromorphinol (RAM-320, 14-Hydroxydihydromorphine) is an opiate analogue that is a derivative of morphine, where the 14-position has been hydroxylated and the 7,8- double bond saturated. It has similar effects to morphine such as sedation, analgesia and respiratory depression, but is twice as potent as morphine and has a steeper dose-response curve and longer half-life. It is used in medicine as the bitartrate salt (free base conversion ratio 0.643, molecular weight 471.5) and hydrochloride (free base conversion ratio 0.770, molecular weight 393.9) Hydromorphinol was developed in Austria in 1932.

Related Results:
DL-Methamphetamine (4846-07-5, 7632-10-2, 51-57-0)  
Methamphetamine  ·  Desoxyn  ·  Methylamphetamine
Methamphetamine (contracted from N-methylamphetamine) is a strong central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that is mainly used as a recreational drug and less commonly as a second-line treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obesity. Methamphetamine was discovered in 1893 and exists as two enantiomers: levo-methamphetamine and dextro-methamphetamine. Methamphetamine properly refers to a specific chemical, the racemic free base, which is an equal mixture of levomethamphetamine and dextromethamphetamine in their pure amine forms.
Heroin hydrochloride (1502-95-0)  
Heroin  ·  Diamorphine  ·  Diacetylmorphine
Diacetylmorphine (561-27-3)  
Heroin  ·  Diamorphine  ·  Heroin Hydrochloride
Heroin, also known as diamorphine among other names, is an opioid most commonly used as a recreational drug for its euphoric effects. Medically it is used in several countries to relieve pain or in opioid replacement therapy. Heroin is typically injected, usually into a vein; however, it can also be smoked, snorted or inhaled.
UNII-8LXS95BSA9 (5965-13-9)  
dihydrocodeine  ·  dihydrocodeine bitartrate  ·  Paracodin
Dihydrocodeine is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic prescribed for pain or severe dyspnea, or as an antitussive, either alone or compounded with paracetamol (as in co-dydramol) or aspirin. It was developed in Germany in 1908 and first marketed in 1911. Commonly available as tablets, solutions, elixirs, and other oral forms, dihydrocodeine is also available in some countries as an injectable solution for deep subcutaneous and intra-muscular administration.
DIHYDROCODEINE (125-28-0)  
dihydrocodeine bitartrate  ·  Paracodin  ·  DF 118
Dihydrocodeine is a semi-synthetic opioid analgesic prescribed for pain or severe dyspnea, or as an antitussive, either alone or compounded with paracetamol (as in co-dydramol) or aspirin. It was developed in Germany in 1908 and first marketed in 1911. Commonly available as tablets, solutions, elixirs, and other oral forms, dihydrocodeine is also available in some countries as an injectable solution for deep subcutaneous and intra-muscular administration.
826-10-8 (826-10-8, 51-57-0)  
Methamphetamine  ·  Desoxyn  ·  Methylamphetamine
Tramadol (123154-38-1, 27203-92-5)  
Ultram  ·  Tramal  ·  Tramadol Hydrochloride
Tramadol, sold under the brand name Ultram among others, is an opioid pain medication used to treat moderate to moderately severe pain. When taken by mouth in an immediate-release formulation, the onset of pain relief usually occurs within an hour. It is often combined with paracetamol (acetaminophen) as this is known to improve the efficacy of tramadol in relieving pain.
Next Page >