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Alkaloids, Convulsants

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Neurotoxins (7)
Drugs acting on the nervous system (2)
Natural opium alkaloids (2)
Opium (2)
Psychoactive drugs (2)

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2,3-Dimethoxystrychnidin-10-one (357-57-3)  
Brucine, an alkaloid closely related to strychnine, is most commonly found in the Strychnos nux-vomica tree. Brucine poisoning is rare, since it is usually ingested with strychnine, and strychnine is more toxic than brucine. In synthetic chemistry, it can be used as a tool for stereospecific chemical syntheses.
BRUCINE (357-57-3)  
dimethoxystrychnine  ·  10,11-dimethoxystrychnine  ·  bruzin
Brucine, an alkaloid closely related to strychnine, is most commonly found in the Strychnos nux-vomica tree. Brucine poisoning is rare, since it is usually ingested with strychnine, and strychnine is more toxic than brucine. In synthetic chemistry, it can be used as a tool for stereospecific chemical syntheses.
Laudanosine (1699-51-0, 2688-77-9)  
Laudanosine or N-methyltetrahydropapaverine is a recognized metabolite of atracurium and cisatracurium. Laudanosine decreases the seizure threshold, and thus it can induce seizures if present at sufficient threshold concentrations; however such concentrations are unlikely to be produced consequent to chemodegradable metabolism of clinically administered doses of cisatracurium or atracurium. Laudanosine also occurs naturally in minute amounts (0.1%) in opium, from which it was first isolated in 1871.
NSC 35045 (2688-77-9)  
laudanosine
Laudanosine or N-methyltetrahydropapaverine is a recognized metabolite of atracurium and cisatracurium. Laudanosine decreases the seizure threshold, and thus it can induce seizures if present at sufficient threshold concentrations; however such concentrations are unlikely to be produced consequent to chemodegradable metabolism of clinically administered doses of cisatracurium or atracurium. Laudanosine also occurs naturally in minute amounts (0.1%) in opium, from which it was first isolated in 1871.
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Alkaloids
Convulsants